Scott Arbor
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CSA Delivery for June 11th

6/11/2014 9:46am

The season begins with lots more to follow!

This week's share includes Zucchinis, Yellows Squashes, Tatume Squash, Tomatoes, Carrots and Sweet Onions.

Insect report: Various bugs like to bite the tomatoes.  Who can blame them?  They're delicious!  Just cut around the bite.

We're estimating next week's share to include pretty much the same as this week.

Possible addtions to that list might be Cucumbers.

We got to see the damage the flood weather caused when we went to pull carrots.  About half the crop has rotted off in the ground so it wasn't a fun harvest experience.  Rain for a vegetable farm is always bittersweet.  We pushed through it and founds some pretty great carrots.  This is a leftover crop from the Winter season so we're fortunate to enjoy some still.  The various bugs on the farm trimmed the tops, but the bottoms look great.

You're also receiving a Tatume squash.  It may seem a little intimidating, but think of it as a zucchini.  Cook it anyway you would a Summer squash.  It's not a Winter squash so it doesn't require that long cooking time like a butternut squash would.  My favorite way to cook a tatume is the same way you would a spaghetii squash.  The texture is the same. Cut in half.  Scrape out the seeds.  Bake in oven at 325 degrees or until tender.  Then scrape out the stringy flesh with a fork.  Then top with your favorite sauce.  It's a real gem of a squash.

We also have a couple tomatoes in your share today.  What a nice surprise!  We can all thank Nancy H. for weeding this crop on a volunteer day all by herself.  The rest of us were busy planting Summer squashes, but she asked if she could go weed the tomatoes.  So she did for five hours all on her own.  Thanks Nancy for the tomatoes!

It's great when a volunteer works hard to make everyone's CSA share better.  We've had some amazing effort from every volunteer this season.  The crops look great because of them all.  Each we'll all get to enjoy everyone's hard work.  Lots more to come!  Thanks for the support!

Spring Flowers

6/2/2014 6:31pm

We never had Texas Bluebonnets on the farm.  Instead we had flowers of all colors and sizes.  Some of these little flowers are smaller than a dime.  Every year it gets better too.  Our little piece of the Earth has become healthier over the last three decades making way for many of the flowers to return.  Mixed in with the flowers always are the natural grasses too.  Nature is beautiful.

 

CSA Delivery for May 14th - Extra Week

5/14/2014 12:44pm

This is the first extra week!  Enjoy some bonus veggies this week and next.  The crops still want to harvest next week so we'll gladly do one last harvest next week for you.

Summer CSA memberships are now available!  You can keep the good veggies coming by visiting our returning member link here: http://scottarborcsa.com/members/returning  The Summer season begins in early June with the Summer veggie crops!

Volunteer this Saturday May 17th to earn some credit off your Summer membership.  9am to 2pm.  RSVP to this email to reserve your spot.

This week's share is 2 bags tied together making 1 share.  So, grab 1 share.  We've already tied the bags together to make it easy for you.  Don't untie the 2 bags.  There was just too much to fit into 1 bag this week.

This week's share includes Lettuce, Radishes, Shallots, Pac Choi, Snow Peas, Cabbage and Carrots.

Insect report: Harlequin beetles are enjoying munching on the veggies.  They create the scarring on a crop like the broccoli raab and kale.  There are also the big fuzzy worms munching the lettuce crop.  We're picking everyone off we can find, but we may miss one on occasion.

We're estimating next week's share to include pretty much the same as this week.

Possible addtions to that list might be Swiss Chard and/or beets.

Heather B. has been a member of our CSA since the beginning many years back.  She sends some recipes to share with everyone. 

She says, "These two are what we made with our cauliflower and our cabbage this week. They both came out yummy! Looking forward to more veggies tomorrow!"

Indian Spiced Risotto
.25 c water
1 large onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 t minced fresh ginger
.75 c uncooked arborio rice
3 c small cauliflower florets
15 oz can of chickpeas, rinsed and drained
.75 t ground coriander
.75 t ground cumin
.25 t cardamom
.25 t turmeric
.25 t salt
2 c vegetable broth (more if needed)
13 oz can unsweetened coconut milk
1.5 c thawed frozen peas

Heat water in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, and ginger, and cook until the onion is soft and lightly browned, about 10 minutes. Add the rice, cauliflower, chickpeas and spices. Add the broth and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer, add in coconut milk. Cover and simmer until vegetables and rice are tender and liquid has been absorbed (about 40 minutes). If the mixture is too dry, add additional vegetable broth.

Stir in peas. Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. Serve hot.

This recipe is modified from one in One Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson.

......

Cabbage and Baguette Casserole with Fontina
1 head green cabbage
1 baguette, sliced in .5 inch rounds
2 quarts vegetable broth
4 oz Fontina cheese

Wash the cabbage, discard any tough outer leaves, cut into strips then 1" by 1" chunks or smaller. Steam cabbage 7 minutes, allow to cool.

Place the baguette rounds in a single layer in a large casserole dish. Top with grated Fontina and black pepper. Cover with steamed cabbage. Pour broth all over (should cover all bread and cheese, up to cabbage).

Cover with foil. Bake in preheated 325 oven for 45 minutes, uncovered for 15 minutes.

Serve in bowls, be generous with broth over bread and cheesey cabbage.

This recipe is modified from one in Italian Vegetarian Cooking by Paola Gavin.

I'm also including Teresa's many recipes again.  Lots of helpful ideas in all of them.

Teresa S. says, "Below are some of my foundational recipes for the veggies we're getting right now (or will be soon). "

"I eat a whole foods, plant-based diet with very little oil added so I eat a lot of veggies! I also shared the recipes publicly on Say Mmm, so that any members who also use it can get the grocery lists very simply." http://www.saymmm.com/me/fityoginirunner/t/f1434

"One note about the Chinese recipes: I cook a lot of Chinese food because I used to live in China and so naturally think of Chinese dishes when I think of tofu and non-salad green vegetable dishes. (We found ourselves in a sea of leafy green vegetables we didn't recognize and didn't know how to cook when we first moved. Can't make salad for food safety reasons in China so salad was out.) Most dishes in China are squarely labeled by a single kind of content: vegetable, tofu, fish, meat, etc. You don't get a little of everything like in Chinese restaurants here in most everyday dishes. Real fancy restaurants have dishes with many kinds of ingredients like Buddha's Delight but home cooking and corner restaurant food is simpler as always. So you would make rice and then roughly a dish a person, selecting to get a variety and always a vegetable. I added a few tofu dishes to the Say Mmm public share, assuming that most people won't have their own library of protein dishes to go to."

Thanks Teresa!
 
Garlic-Roasted Garbanzo Beans & Swiss Chard over Polenta
Beans and legumes
,
Vegan
 
 
For the garbanzos:
3 cups garbanzo beans (chickpeas), cooked (or 2 15.5-ounce cans)
5 garlic cloves, peeled
2 large shallots (can substitute green garlic or green shallots)
3 small bay leaves
2 teaspoons fennel seeds

For the chard:
2 garlic cloves, peeled, chopped
3 small bay leaves
2 shallots, sliced
2 small or 1 large bunch Swiss chard, large ribs trimmed off, leaves coarsely torn
1 1/2 cups vegetable stock 

For the polenta:
4 cups water
1 cup polenta (coarse-ground cornmeal), not instant
1 teaspoon salt (optional)

Directions

Start the garbanzos:
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. In a Pyrex baking dish (8×8 or 11×7), combine the garbanzos, garlic, shallots, and bay leaves. Sprinkle with coarse salt and black pepper.
  3. Cover with foil and bake for 45 minutes, until the garlic cloves and shallots are soft. Set aside at room temperature until ready to add to the chard.
After you put the garbanzos in to roast, start your polenta:
  1. In a medium pot, bring 4 cups of water and a teaspoon of salt to the boil. Stream in the polenta, whisking contantly, and continue whisking until the polenta thickens slightly and is suspended throughout the liquid, about 1 minute.
  2. Cover the pot, turn down the heat, and simmer for 1 hour. Stir the polenta occasionally; it should be cooking at a rate of a slow bubble. (Alternately, pour boiling water and polenta into slow cooker and turn to high for 1.5h.)
About 15 minutes before your polenta is finished cooking, make the chard:
  1. Heat a dash of water in a large, heavy pot over medium heat. Add the garlic, bay leaves, and shallots, cover, and cook until the shallots are tender, about 10 minutes. Add more water as needed.
  2. Uncover and add the swiss chard, stirring. Add the vegetable stock, stir to combine, then cover the pot to braise the chard until it’s wilted and tender.
  3. Uncover the pot and continue to cook until some of the broth has evaporated, then add the roasted garbanzo bean mixture. Stir to combine, cook over medium heat until heated through, a few more minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings with salt or pepper as needed.
At this point your polenta should be finished cooking. Divide among serving dishes (if you have any left over, spread it on a sheet pan to cool.)

Spoon the chard and garbanzo mixture, with some of the juices, over the polenta and serve.
Notes :
 
Instead of polenta, the garbanzo and chard saute would be equally delicious over pasta or any cooked grain.

1 lb of dry garbanzos makes about 3.5 cups cooked garbanzos.

Makes 4-6 main course servings.
 
 
 
 
ç��油è�� (chÇ�o yóucài) Stir-fried Bok Choy
Vegetables
,
Chinese
,
Vegan
,
Esselstyn-approved
 
 
Ingredients
ä¸ï¿½æµ·æ²¹è�� ShànghÇ�i yóucài (Shanghai bok choy) or 1 bunch mature æ²¹è�� yóucài
2 garlic cloves, smashed with the bottom of a drinking glass
3 thin slices of ginger, smashed with the bottom of a drinking glass

Sauce
2 Tbsp chicken stock (make vegetable if strictly vegan)
2 Tbsp light soy sauce (é�±æ²¹ jiàng yóu) 
2 Tbsp ShàoxÄ«ng rice wine (ç»ï¿½å�´é�� ShàoxÄ«ng jiÇ�)
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp roasted sesame oil optional; omit completely for health, keep in for flavor, to compromise use 1/2 tsp)

Preparation

1. If using ä¸ï¿½æµ·æ²¹è�� ShànghÇ�i yóucài (Shanghai bok choy), quarter each bok choy lengthwise. If using a mature bunch of bok choy: Trim off any roots that may hold the pieces together, then wash well and dry thoroughly, then cut the bok choy into 5-8 cm (2-3 in) lengths. 

2. Combine sauce ingredients.

3. Heat a wok over high heat until very hot. Stir-fry the garlic and ginger for 30 seconds, adding a spash of water if necessary to prevent sticking. 

4. Add the bok choy and stir-fry until it begins to wilt, then add the sauce.

5. Simmer, covered, for 2 minutes, or until the stems and leaves are tender but still green. 
Notes :
 
This recipe has been modified to remove cooking oil, with the exception of the flavorant oil.

Serves 2. 

WITHOUT OIL
68 calories per serving.

P90X servings: 1 vegetable, 1/2 condiment
P90X2 servings: 1 vegetable, 1/2 condiment

WITH OIL
90 calories per serving.

P90X servings: 1 vegetable, 1/2 condiment, 1/5 fat
P90X2 servings: 1 vegetable, 1/2 condiment, 1/5 fat

Ingredient notes:
There is significant variation in the name of the vegetable for this dish. The naming here is northern Chinese (æ²¹è�� yóucài [literally "oil vegetable", because most of the cooking oil in China is extracted from the seed of this plant]). In the ä¸ï¿½æµ· ShànghÇ�i dialect, the name is é��è�� qÄ«ng cài (literally "blue-green vegetable") or or é��æ±ï¿½è�� qÄ«ngjiÄ�ngcài (literally "blue/green river vegetable"). In Cantonese, the name is ç�½è�� báicài (literally white vegetable) and is pronounced "baak choi" in Cantonese, giving rise to the name "bok choy" English name, ç�½è�� báicài in north China is a different vegetable, Napa cabbage. Various romanizations of the Cantonese name and pronounciation of ç�½è�� báicài have also given rise to the spellings pak choi, bok choi, and pak choy.

There are several sizes on the market, at least three. The largest has very white stems and dark green leaves. The medium-size, often sold as baby bok choy in Western supermarkets, is lighter uniform green and a third of the size, sometimes called ä¸ï¿½æµ·æ²¹è�� ShànghÇ�i yóucài. The third are about half that size again and sold as baby bok choy in some Chinese supermarkets.

You can also use è��å¿ï¿½ càixÄ«n (literally vegetable heart), also known as choy sum, in this dish, as it is a different cultivar of the same brassica plant as æ²¹è�� yóucài.

Soy sauce comes in two variants, light and dark, referring to color. Light soy sauce (é�±æ²¹ jiàng yóu) is "regular" soy sauce.

Shaoxing rice wine (ç»ï¿½å�´é�� ShàoxÄ«ng jiÇ�) is the standard Chinese cooking wine. It is a reddish rice wine from ç»ï¿½å�´ (ShàoxÄ«ng) in æµï¿½æ±ï¿½ (ZhèjiÄ�ng) province. Authentic ShàoxÄ«ng rice wine will take a trip to a Chinese or Asian grocery store. You can substitute dry sherry fairly well, if you don't have ç»ï¿½å�´é�� ShàoxÄ«ng jiÇ�.

Roasted sesame oil is a rich brown color. You cannot substitute untoasted sesame oil, the roasting of the seeds is what gives the roasted sesame oil the "Chinese" flavor. If you do not have roasted sesame oil, simply omit the oil, din't bother substituting. Roasted sesame oil is available in regular grocery stores in small bottles and in Chinese grocery stores in large bottles. The Chinese name is 麻油 (máyóu).

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Root to Leaf Beet Gnocchi
Pasta
,
Vegetables
,
Italian
|
 
 
Ingredients
3 large beets with beet greens
salt and pepper to taste
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 egg (try egg-free if strictly vegan)
2 Tbsp corn starch
1 Tbsp sage
1/4 cup white wine
1 clove garlic
1/4 cup blackberries
1 cup snow peas

Instructions:
Wrap the beets in foil and bake them in 400 degrees for 1 hour, or until a fork is inserted and easily comes out. 

Let cool, peel, and dice. Mash beets thoroughly. 

Add the egg to the beets, and mix until just combined. Add the flour, cornstarch, salt and pepper until a dough comes together. Divide the dough in 4 pieces and roll each into a log. Cut into small pieces. In a skillet, heat a splash of water. 

Add the sage, garlic and gnocchi, and cook for 2 minutes. Add the snow peas, blackberries and beet greens and cook for 1 minute more, turning the gnocchi as needed. Add the white wine and cook until reduced by half. Serve.
Notes :
 
This recipe was modified from the original to be dairy-free and oil-free. An egg remains, because I do not know enough about pasta making to know how to remove it; if you are strictly vegan, you can try simply dropping it, of course.

For more information on making good gnocchi, see http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/how-to-make-gnocchi-like-an-italian-grandmother-recipe.html
 
 
 
 
 
Simple Sauteed Swiss Chard Recipe
Vegetables
,
Vegan
 
 
Ingredients
1 large bunch of Swiss chard leaves, cut into strips
5 garlic cloves
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
1/2 tsp red pepper flakes (optional)
1 tsp salt
Pepper to taste

Preparation
  1. Set a large non-stick skillet over medium heat and bring a dash of water to the boil.
  2. Add in the garlic and cook until tender and aromatic, about 2 minutes.
  3. Toss in the Swiss chard, balsamic vinegar and red pepper flakes; cook and stir until the chard is wilted and tender, about 5 minutes. Add a few dashes of water as needed to prevent sticking.
  4. Season with salt and pepper and serve.
Notes :
 
Preparation time: 5 minutes, cooking time: 7 minutes.
 
 
ç��é�ªè±ï¿½å��å�¬è�� (chÇ�o xuÄ�dòu hé dÅ�nggÅ«) Snow peas and mushrooms stir-fried with ginger and spring onions
Vegetables
,
Chinese
,
Vegan
 
 
Ingredients
250 g (1/2 lb) fresh snow peas
250 g fresh shiitake mushrooms (�� d�nggū or �� hu�gū) or 8-10 dried ones, soaked in hot water
6 slices ginger, shredded finely
4 spring onions, cut into 2.5 cm sections

Sauce
1 1/2 Tbsp light soy sauce
1 1/2 Tbsp ShàoxÄ«ng rice wine (ç»ï¿½å�´é�� ShàoxÄ«ng jiÇ�)
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp roasted sesame oil (optional; omit for health, keep for taste; use 1/2 tsp to compromise)

Preparation
Wash the snow peas, snap off the tips and pull away the "strings" from the sides.

Wipe the mushrooms on a damp cloth to remove any grit, cut away stems and cut in half if large. If using dried mushrooms, trim away stems and cut each mushroom into four slices.

Combine all sauce ingredients and set aside.

Heat non-stick wok and, when hot, add the snow peas and stir-fry quickly until they turn a bright green color, about 1 minute. Add a splash of water if necessary to keep peas from sticking. Immediately transfer to plate and leave aside.

Re-heat wok. Add the mushrooms and ginger. Stir-fry about 2 minutes, add the sauce and cook for another minute.

Add the pre-cooked snow peas and the spring onions and stir-fry to blend for 1 more minute. Transfer to a serving dish.
Notes :
 
Ingredient notes:
Shiitake mushrooms are also widely used in China, not just Japan. Although they are mostly known by their Japanese name in the US, they are also referred to as Chinese mushrooms in English. In China, they are sold dried in large packages. This is the cheapest way to buy them, so if you enjoy them, buy a bulk package in a Chinese grocery store. Their Chinese name is winter mushroom (�� d�nggū) or flower mushroom (�� hu�gū).

Soy sauce comes in two variants, light and dark, referring to color. Light soy sauce (é�±æ²¹ jiàng yóu) is "regular" soy sauce.

Roasted sesame oil is a rich brown color. You cannot substitute untoasted sesame oil, the roasting of the seeds is what gives the roasted sesame oil the "Chinese" flavor. If you do not have roasted sesame oil, simply omit the oil, din't bother substituting. Roasted sesame oil is available in regular grocery stores in small bottles and in Chinese grocery stores in large bottles. The Chinese name is 麻油 (máyóu)
��
 
 
 
Winter salad
Salads
,
Vegetables
,
Swedish
 
 
1/4 cabbage
1 sour apple
1 medium beet
2 carrots
2 Tbsp lemon juice
2 Tbsp white wine vinegar
Tarragon to taste
Black pepper to taste
1 tsp Dijon mustard

Grate all the produce and mix in a big ziplock bag. Whisk or otherwise forcefully blend the lemon juice, vinegar, tarragon, black pepper, and mustard.

Pour the oil-free dressing into the bag. Shake up the salad and the dressing. Refrigerate until it's time to eat.

Cabbage in a sour dressing keeps very well.

Makes 2 P90X2 vegetable servings.
 
Lemony Beet, Carrot and Parsley Salad
Salads
,
Vegan
|
 
 
3 medium beets
4 large carrots
1 bunch Italian parsley (1 packed cup chopped )
4 spring onions, chopped (about 1/2 cup)
2 Tbsp lemon juice
2 Tbsp white wine vinegar
Tarragon to taste
Black pepper to taste
1 tsp Dijon mustard

I use the shredder disc of my Cuisinart to shred the carrots and beets, chopped the parsley and onions, and mixed them together. You can slice the beets and carrots then cut them into matchsticks, shred them on a shredder, or chop them. Just make sure the beet pieces are thin enough so the dressing will penetrate and soften the pieces. Whisk or otherwise forcefully blend the lemon juice, vinegar, tarragon, black pepper, and mustard. Add some of the dressing just to moisten (about 1/4 cup or to taste) and let sit for 20-30 minutes in the fridge.
You can serve this on a bed of spinach or by itself.

What are you cooking lately?  Share your favorite recipes with me and I'll share them with everyone.

Thanks for your support!

2014 Summer CSA Season Now Open!

5/5/2014 10:25am

The 2014 Summer CSA Season is now open!

We're growing for 13 weeks this Summer costing just $25 per week.  This is definitely a Summer you want to be a member for.  We've condensed down last year's sixteen week season into a packed thirteen week harvest.  It will be great!  It only takes a downpayment to reserve your spot.  We'd love to have you sign up again.  Visit our returning member page to sign up: http://scottarborcsa.com/members/returning

We've converted all vacation hold "make-up" deliveries to credit on your membership.  There's just not enough time inbetween the Winter and Summer season to make up the deliveries missed due to vacation holds.

We've also added volunteer day credits to your membership if you've been helping out on the volunteer days.

Your membership balance is: %%member-balance%%

(If you show a balance then we may not have received all the payments for the past season.  Email me if you have questions.)

Early season shares in the Summer typically contain tomatoes, cucumbers, squashes, basil and possibly a green leafy vegetable left from the Winter crops like Swiss Chard, carrots.  Soon after that the sweet peppers, jalapenos, eggplant and melons will start being harvested to include in the weekly share.  Towards the end of the season is when crops like okra, butternut squash, Rumbo squashes, yardlong beans, Japanese cucumbers and more melons start to harvest along with vegetables that remain from the earlier weeks.  The season changes and transitions from one crop to another with lots to enjoy throughout.  Check out our anticipated harvest calendar to see what each month may provide: http://scottarborcsa.com/our-harvest-calendar

We're excited to have 3 crops of tomatoes planted this year.  Each crop went in a month apart with the final planting going in this weekend.  It should be a great tomato season ahead with many weeks to enjoy of homegrown tomatoes.

We're also planting the same mix of cantaloupes and honeydew that we grew last Summer, which resulted in around six weeks of having a cantaloupe or honeydew in the share.  We're looking forward to those weeks of deliciously sweet melons!  We're also planting a big test crop of a new watermelon for harvest late Summer harvest.  If it works then we'll have a watermelon for everyone when the hot weather in August comes.

Also, we've decided to not renew our Organic certification with the USDA for the Summer ahead.  We thought about this decision for many weeks and came to the conclusion that it was time to not be a part of that program any longer.  We held the certification for almost 25 years and we're proud of that.  Will this change any of our growing practices on our farm?  Not at all.  Clyde and Ellan bought the farm in 1977 and never put down a herbicide or sprayed a chemical ever!

So, we're still growing organic.  The vegetables and fruits we deliver will always be chemical free, healthy and delicious.  We hope to keep feeding you and your family!

We'll be having an open farm day at the beginning of the Summer season in June.  Come check out the crops then and how we grow them.  Lots to enjoy for the Summmer ahead.

CSA Delivery for May 3rd

5/2/2014 8:31pm

This week's share is 2 bags tied together making 1 share.  So, grab 1 share.  We've already tied the bags together to make it easy for you.  Don't untie the 2 bags.  There was just too much to fit into 1 bag this week.

This week's share includes Beets w/ Beet Greens, Lettuce, Cauliflower Florets, Radishes, Pac Choi, Kale, Swiss Chard, Broccoli Raab

Insect report: Harlequin beetles are enjoying munching on the veggies.  They create the scarring on a crop like the broccoli raab.  There are also the big fuzzy worms munching the lettuce crop.  We're picking everyone off we can find, but we may miss one on occasion.

We're estimating next week's share to include green shallots, radishes, pac choi, lettuce, kale, swiss chard and broccoli raab.

Possible addtions to that list might be carrots and/or snow peas.

This is week 11 so 1 more official delivery to go next week.  We'll then evaluate the crops left and drop off 1 or 2 extra deliveries on the following weeks.

Kelly R. sends a recipes to share with everyone.  She says, "Here is a recipe for Roasted Cauliflower and Chickpea tacos that were fantastic!  I was able to use the cauliflower and cabbage from last week's share.  I will definitely be making these again in the summer and using zucchini instead of cauliflower."

Teresa S. also has many helpful and interesting recipes to share.  She says:

"Below are some of my foundational recipes for the veggies we're getting right now (or will be soon). "

"I eat a whole foods, plant-based diet with very little oil added so I eat a lot of veggies! I also shared the recipes publicly on Say Mmm, so that any members who also use it can get the grocery lists very simply." http://www.saymmm.com/me/fityoginirunner/t/f1434

"One note about the Chinese recipes: I cook a lot of Chinese food because I used to live in China and so naturally think of Chinese dishes when I think of tofu and non-salad green vegetable dishes. (We found ourselves in a sea of leafy green vegetables we didn't recognize and didn't know how to cook when we first moved. Can't make salad for food safety reasons in China so salad was out.) Most dishes in China are squarely labeled by a single kind of content: vegetable, tofu, fish, meat, etc. You don't get a little of everything like in Chinese restaurants here in most everyday dishes. Real fancy restaurants have dishes with many kinds of ingredients like Buddha's Delight but home cooking and corner restaurant food is simpler as always. So you would make rice and then roughly a dish a person, selecting to get a variety and always a vegetable. I added a few tofu dishes to the Say Mmm public share, assuming that most people won't have their own library of protein dishes to go to."

Thanks Teresa!
 
Garlic-Roasted Garbanzo Beans & Swiss Chard over Polenta
Beans and legumes
,
Vegan
 
 
For the garbanzos:
3 cups garbanzo beans (chickpeas), cooked (or 2 15.5-ounce cans)
5 garlic cloves, peeled
2 large shallots (can substitute green garlic or green shallots)
3 small bay leaves
2 teaspoons fennel seeds

For the chard:
2 garlic cloves, peeled, chopped
3 small bay leaves
2 shallots, sliced
2 small or 1 large bunch Swiss chard, large ribs trimmed off, leaves coarsely torn
1 1/2 cups vegetable stock 

For the polenta:
4 cups water
1 cup polenta (coarse-ground cornmeal), not instant
1 teaspoon salt (optional)

Directions

Start the garbanzos:
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. In a Pyrex baking dish (8×8 or 11×7), combine the garbanzos, garlic, shallots, and bay leaves. Sprinkle with coarse salt and black pepper.
  3. Cover with foil and bake for 45 minutes, until the garlic cloves and shallots are soft. Set aside at room temperature until ready to add to the chard.
After you put the garbanzos in to roast, start your polenta:
  1. In a medium pot, bring 4 cups of water and a teaspoon of salt to the boil. Stream in the polenta, whisking contantly, and continue whisking until the polenta thickens slightly and is suspended throughout the liquid, about 1 minute.
  2. Cover the pot, turn down the heat, and simmer for 1 hour. Stir the polenta occasionally; it should be cooking at a rate of a slow bubble. (Alternately, pour boiling water and polenta into slow cooker and turn to high for 1.5h.)
About 15 minutes before your polenta is finished cooking, make the chard:
  1. Heat a dash of water in a large, heavy pot over medium heat. Add the garlic, bay leaves, and shallots, cover, and cook until the shallots are tender, about 10 minutes. Add more water as needed.
  2. Uncover and add the swiss chard, stirring. Add the vegetable stock, stir to combine, then cover the pot to braise the chard until it’s wilted and tender.
  3. Uncover the pot and continue to cook until some of the broth has evaporated, then add the roasted garbanzo bean mixture. Stir to combine, cook over medium heat until heated through, a few more minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings with salt or pepper as needed.
At this point your polenta should be finished cooking. Divide among serving dishes (if you have any left over, spread it on a sheet pan to cool.)

Spoon the chard and garbanzo mixture, with some of the juices, over the polenta and serve.
Notes :
 
Instead of polenta, the garbanzo and chard saute would be equally delicious over pasta or any cooked grain.

1 lb of dry garbanzos makes about 3.5 cups cooked garbanzos.

Makes 4-6 main course servings.
 
 
 
 
ç��æ²¹è�� (chÇ�o yóucài) Stir-fried Bok Choy
Vegetables
,
Chinese
,
Vegan
,
Esselstyn-approved
 
 
Ingredients
ä¸�æµ·æ²¹è�� ShànghÇ�i yóucài (Shanghai bok choy) or 1 bunch mature æ²¹è�� yóucài
2 garlic cloves, smashed with the bottom of a drinking glass
3 thin slices of ginger, smashed with the bottom of a drinking glass

Sauce
2 Tbsp chicken stock (make vegetable if strictly vegan)
2 Tbsp light soy sauce (é�±æ²¹ jiàng yóu) 
2 Tbsp ShàoxÄ«ng rice wine (ç»�å�´é�� ShàoxÄ«ng jiÇ�)
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp roasted sesame oil optional; omit completely for health, keep in for flavor, to compromise use 1/2 tsp)

Preparation

1. If using ä¸�æµ·æ²¹è�� ShànghÇ�i yóucài (Shanghai bok choy), quarter each bok choy lengthwise. If using a mature bunch of bok choy: Trim off any roots that may hold the pieces together, then wash well and dry thoroughly, then cut the bok choy into 5-8 cm (2-3 in) lengths. 

2. Combine sauce ingredients.

3. Heat a wok over high heat until very hot. Stir-fry the garlic and ginger for 30 seconds, adding a spash of water if necessary to prevent sticking. 

4. Add the bok choy and stir-fry until it begins to wilt, then add the sauce.

5. Simmer, covered, for 2 minutes, or until the stems and leaves are tender but still green. 
Notes :
 
This recipe has been modified to remove cooking oil, with the exception of the flavorant oil.

Serves 2. 

WITHOUT OIL
68 calories per serving.

P90X servings: 1 vegetable, 1/2 condiment
P90X2 servings: 1 vegetable, 1/2 condiment

WITH OIL
90 calories per serving.

P90X servings: 1 vegetable, 1/2 condiment, 1/5 fat
P90X2 servings: 1 vegetable, 1/2 condiment, 1/5 fat

Ingredient notes:
There is significant variation in the name of the vegetable for this dish. The naming here is northern Chinese (æ²¹è�� yóucài [literally "oil vegetable", because most of the cooking oil in China is extracted from the seed of this plant]). In the ä¸�æµ· ShànghÇ�i dialect, the name is é��è�� qÄ«ng cài (literally "blue-green vegetable") or or é��æ±�è�� qÄ«ngjiÄ�ngcài (literally "blue/green river vegetable"). In Cantonese, the name is ç�½è�� báicài (literally white vegetable) and is pronounced "baak choi" in Cantonese, giving rise to the name "bok choy" English name, ç�½è�� báicài in north China is a different vegetable, Napa cabbage. Various romanizations of the Cantonese name and pronounciation of ç�½è�� báicài have also given rise to the spellings pak choi, bok choi, and pak choy.

There are several sizes on the market, at least three. The largest has very white stems and dark green leaves. The medium-size, often sold as baby bok choy in Western supermarkets, is lighter uniform green and a third of the size, sometimes called ä¸�æµ·æ²¹è�� ShànghÇ�i yóucài. The third are about half that size again and sold as baby bok choy in some Chinese supermarkets.

You can also use è��å¿� càixÄ«n (literally vegetable heart), also known as choy sum, in this dish, as it is a different cultivar of the same brassica plant as æ²¹è�� yóucài.

Soy sauce comes in two variants, light and dark, referring to color. Light soy sauce (é�±æ²¹ jiàng yóu) is "regular" soy sauce.

Shaoxing rice wine (ç»�å�´é�� ShàoxÄ«ng jiÇ�) is the standard Chinese cooking wine. It is a reddish rice wine from ç»�å�´ (ShàoxÄ«ng) in æµ�æ±� (ZhèjiÄ�ng) province. Authentic ShàoxÄ«ng rice wine will take a trip to a Chinese or Asian grocery store. You can substitute dry sherry fairly well, if you don't have ç»�å�´é�� ShàoxÄ«ng jiÇ�.

Roasted sesame oil is a rich brown color. You cannot substitute untoasted sesame oil, the roasting of the seeds is what gives the roasted sesame oil the "Chinese" flavor. If you do not have roasted sesame oil, simply omit the oil, din't bother substituting. Roasted sesame oil is available in regular grocery stores in small bottles and in Chinese grocery stores in large bottles. The Chinese name is 麻油 (máyóu).

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Root to Leaf Beet Gnocchi
Pasta
,
Vegetables
,
Italian
|
 
 
Ingredients
3 large beets with beet greens
salt and pepper to taste
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 egg (try egg-free if strictly vegan)
2 Tbsp corn starch
1 Tbsp sage
1/4 cup white wine
1 clove garlic
1/4 cup blackberries
1 cup snow peas

Instructions:
Wrap the beets in foil and bake them in 400 degrees for 1 hour, or until a fork is inserted and easily comes out. 

Let cool, peel, and dice. Mash beets thoroughly. 

Add the egg to the beets, and mix until just combined. Add the flour, cornstarch, salt and pepper until a dough comes together. Divide the dough in 4 pieces and roll each into a log. Cut into small pieces. In a skillet, heat a splash of water. 

Add the sage, garlic and gnocchi, and cook for 2 minutes. Add the snow peas, blackberries and beet greens and cook for 1 minute more, turning the gnocchi as needed. Add the white wine and cook until reduced by half. Serve.
Notes :
 
This recipe was modified from the original to be dairy-free and oil-free. An egg remains, because I do not know enough about pasta making to know how to remove it; if you are strictly vegan, you can try simply dropping it, of course.

For more information on making good gnocchi, see http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/how-to-make-gnocchi-like-an-italian-grandmother-recipe.html
 
 
 
 
 
Simple Sauteed Swiss Chard Recipe
Vegetables
,
Vegan
 
 
Ingredients
1 large bunch of Swiss chard leaves, cut into strips
5 garlic cloves
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
1/2 tsp red pepper flakes (optional)
1 tsp salt
Pepper to taste

Preparation
  1. Set a large non-stick skillet over medium heat and bring a dash of water to the boil.
  2. Add in the garlic and cook until tender and aromatic, about 2 minutes.
  3. Toss in the Swiss chard, balsamic vinegar and red pepper flakes; cook and stir until the chard is wilted and tender, about 5 minutes. Add a few dashes of water as needed to prevent sticking.
  4. Season with salt and pepper and serve.
Notes :
 
Preparation time: 5 minutes, cooking time: 7 minutes.
 
 
ç��é�ªè±�å��å�¬è�� (chÇ�o xuÄ�dòu hé dÅ�nggÅ«) Snow peas and mushrooms stir-fried with ginger and spring onions
Vegetables
,
Chinese
,
Vegan
 
 
Ingredients
250 g (1/2 lb) fresh snow peas
250 g fresh shiitake mushrooms (�� d�nggū or �� hu�gū) or 8-10 dried ones, soaked in hot water
6 slices ginger, shredded finely
4 spring onions, cut into 2.5 cm sections

Sauce
1 1/2 Tbsp light soy sauce
1 1/2 Tbsp ShàoxÄ«ng rice wine (ç»�å�´é�� ShàoxÄ«ng jiÇ�)
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp roasted sesame oil (optional; omit for health, keep for taste; use 1/2 tsp to compromise)

Preparation
Wash the snow peas, snap off the tips and pull away the "strings" from the sides.

Wipe the mushrooms on a damp cloth to remove any grit, cut away stems and cut in half if large. If using dried mushrooms, trim away stems and cut each mushroom into four slices.

Combine all sauce ingredients and set aside.

Heat non-stick wok and, when hot, add the snow peas and stir-fry quickly until they turn a bright green color, about 1 minute. Add a splash of water if necessary to keep peas from sticking. Immediately transfer to plate and leave aside.

Re-heat wok. Add the mushrooms and ginger. Stir-fry about 2 minutes, add the sauce and cook for another minute.

Add the pre-cooked snow peas and the spring onions and stir-fry to blend for 1 more minute. Transfer to a serving dish.
Notes :
 
Ingredient notes:
Shiitake mushrooms are also widely used in China, not just Japan. Although they are mostly known by their Japanese name in the US, they are also referred to as Chinese mushrooms in English. In China, they are sold dried in large packages. This is the cheapest way to buy them, so if you enjoy them, buy a bulk package in a Chinese grocery store. Their Chinese name is winter mushroom (�� d�nggū) or flower mushroom (�� hu�gū).

Soy sauce comes in two variants, light and dark, referring to color. Light soy sauce (é�±æ²¹ jiàng yóu) is "regular" soy sauce.

Roasted sesame oil is a rich brown color. You cannot substitute untoasted sesame oil, the roasting of the seeds is what gives the roasted sesame oil the "Chinese" flavor. If you do not have roasted sesame oil, simply omit the oil, din't bother substituting. Roasted sesame oil is available in regular grocery stores in small bottles and in Chinese grocery stores in large bottles. The Chinese name is 麻油 (máyóu)
��
 
 
 
Winter salad
Salads
,
Vegetables
,
Swedish
 
 
1/4 cabbage
1 sour apple
1 medium beet
2 carrots
2 Tbsp lemon juice
2 Tbsp white wine vinegar
Tarragon to taste
Black pepper to taste
1 tsp Dijon mustard

Grate all the produce and mix in a big ziplock bag. Whisk or otherwise forcefully blend the lemon juice, vinegar, tarragon, black pepper, and mustard.

Pour the oil-free dressing into the bag. Shake up the salad and the dressing. Refrigerate until it's time to eat.

Cabbage in a sour dressing keeps very well.

Makes 2 P90X2 vegetable servings.
 
Lemony Beet, Carrot and Parsley Salad
Salads
,
Vegan
|
 
 
3 medium beets
4 large carrots
1 bunch Italian parsley (1 packed cup chopped )
4 spring onions, chopped (about 1/2 cup)
2 Tbsp lemon juice
2 Tbsp white wine vinegar
Tarragon to taste
Black pepper to taste
1 tsp Dijon mustard

I use the shredder disc of my Cuisinart to shred the carrots and beets, chopped the parsley and onions, and mixed them together. You can slice the beets and carrots then cut them into matchsticks, shred them on a shredder, or chop them. Just make sure the beet pieces are thin enough so the dressing will penetrate and soften the pieces. Whisk or otherwise forcefully blend the lemon juice, vinegar, tarragon, black pepper, and mustard. Add some of the dressing just to moisten (about 1/4 cup or to taste) and let sit for 20-30 minutes in the fridge.
You can serve this on a bed of spinach or by itself.

What are you cooking lately?  Share your favorite recipes with me and I'll share them with everyone.

Thanks for your support!

CSA Delivery for April 26th

4/25/2014 7:32pm

This week's share is 2 bags tied together making 1 share.  So, grab 1 share.  We've already tied the bags together to make it easy for you.  Don't untie the 2 bags.  There was just too much to fit into 1 bag this week.

This week's share includes Spinach, Cheddar Cauliflower, Pac Choi, Green Shallots, Cabbage, Green Leaf Lettuce and Radishes.

Insect report: The veggies are mostly insect free.  The two insects causing the most trouble are big fuzzy worms and halequin beetles.  We pick off every one we find, but we could miss one.  They can be startling sometimes, but they're an easy bug to remove.

We're estimating next week's share to include green shallots, Red Beets, spinach, lettuce, pac choi, swiss chard, radishes and broccoli raab.

Possible addtions to that list might be snow peas if the warm weather will allow it to happen.  They're close.

What are you cooking lately?  Share your favorite recipes with me and I'll share them with everyone.

Thanks for your support!

The North Field Veggies!

4/20/2014 1:47pm

We wanted to share with you the progress of the crops planted up North.  We had to hustle to get many of these crops planted when the cold Winter was freezing other crops out.  The hard work has paid off.  The first picture in each group was taken on March 26th and the second picture was taken yesterday.  A little Spring sunshine makes a big difference.  We're excited bring these crops your way over the next few weeks.

We finished up week 9 last week and will start week 10 this week.  So, you'll have 3 official deliveries delivered to you and then 1 or 2 extra deliveries after that.  The Winter altered our original plan, but there's still lots to harvest and enjoy!

Before.

After.  The Broccoli Raab grows so fast that it will start harvests by week 11.  The radishes will begin harvest this week, which is week 10.

Before.

After.  Lots of vegetables growing here that will start to show up in your share this week.

Before.

After.  Those lettuces will be harvested this week for sure.  The spinach and pac chois have been being harvested.  More to come.

Before.

The green garlic and green shallots have been cleared to make some room for the snow peas.  They've just begun to bloom and we're looking forward to them.  They look good right now, but the weather is getting warmer.  We're hoping to get some harvests, but we'll have to wait anxiously to see how the warm weather influences them.  They like a little cool.

Crops still to harvest out of our other areas are shallots, cauliflowers, cabbages, beets and swiss chard.

Thanks for the support!

CSA Delivery for April 19th

4/18/2014 7:00pm

This week's share is 2 bags tied together making 1 share.  So, grab 1 share.  We've already tied the bags together to make it easy for you.  Don't untie the 2 bags.  There was just too much to fit into 1 bag this week.

This week's share includes Spinach, Cheddar Cauliflower, Pac Choi, Beets with Beet Greens, Green Shallots, Cabbages, Broccoli and Arugula.

Insect report: The veggies are mostly insect free.  A few cabbage loopers are starting to appear on crops other than the cabbages.  There are some fuzzy worms showing up now too.  they'd most likely be on the pac choi or spinach.  They're easy to pick off.  Consider them health inspectors that let you know your veggies have no poisons added.

We're estimating next week's share to include green shallots, green garlic, Red Beets, spinach, lettuce, pac choi, cauliflower and cabbages.

Possible addtions to that list might be broccoli or radishes.

 

Ashley Cox sends a recipe your way.  She says, "Here's our favorite beet preparation at the moment."

 

Roast beets at 400 degrees in foil until tender. We cut the big ones into quarters and it usually takes about 45-55 mins. 
 
 
Wash beet greens and sauté with either green garlic or shallots--whatever is on hand. Season with salt and pepper and a tablespoon of red wine vinegar in last 5 minutes of cooking greens. Add chopped beets to mixture and top with a little bit of feta cheese crumbles before serving (goat cheese also works if one prefers)

What are you cooking lately?  Share your favorite recipes with me and I'll share them with everyone.

Thanks for your support!

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